The 44-Pound Woman Story

FYI I will NOT be posting any thinspo images in this article, this is Rachael in a healthier place (my assumption)

It’s all over the media. It is trending on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Go Fund Me: Rachael Farrokh, only 37 years old, made a social media plea to help her get treatment for anorexia, and her video went viral.

The media followed soon after, printing article after article with names like, 44 Pound Woman Dying of Anorexia Seeks Desperate Help. The world responded to this viral video and the subsequent news coverage, and Rachael’s Go Fund Me page raised over $120,000.

I am glad that  as a result of this, she is going to get help at Denver ACUTE, an eating disorder treatment center in Denver that helps with medical stabilization. I believe that Rachael Farrokh deserves and does desperately need treatment.

As an honest caveat to what will follow, I do not know extensive details on this story, so I cannot say I know much about this woman’s case. I have not watched her Youtube video plea, nor will I. I will not look at the ultra-thin pictures that pop up on my Facebook.

However, I will say this: the media coverage on this story has highly disturbed me.

In my opinion, the media coverage of Rachael Farrokh’s struggle for treatment does a disservice to all of us in:

1. Inaccurately portraying the reality of most eating disorders

2. Perpetuating the glamorization of anorexia and the exploitation of extremely sick individuals

3. Failing to address the systemic issues at play

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1. I want to take a step back.

Around 20 million women and 10 million men will struggle with an eating disorder in their lives. Currently, there are four major types of eating disorders (per the DSM-V): anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, and otherwise specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED).

One of the changes to anorexia in the new DSM is the removal of the criteria that people with the disorder must be 15% under their ideal body weight, because that is sometimes not the case. In fact, people with restrictive eating patterns or anorexia can appear of “normal” weights to others. 

Further, the most common eating disorder is NOT anorexia, it is binge eating disorder. Around 1-5% of people have this disorder, and it is associated with recurrent episodes of binge eating. Most people with this disorder, as well as bulimia, are of normal weight.

The point I’m making is this: people with life-threatening, treatment-meriting eating disorders do NOT necessarily have to be underweight to warrant immediate treatment.

You do not have to be 44 pounds to have an eating disorder… or 54, or 104, or 154, or 204.

Eating disorders are life-threatening and should be treated seriously at their earliest signs and symptoms. Purging can be life-threatening at ANY weight. Binge eating disorder and restrictive eating can be life threatening-too. People with eating disorders are usually required to get medical supervision because electrolyte levels, potassium, hormones, etc. must be monitored, thus reaffirming the point that regardless of the diagnosis eating disorders are serious.

This woman is not the norm of people with an eating disorder. Some or most of the time, eating disorders are not visible to the outside eye. At my “sickest” (binging, overexercising, restricting, whatever) people have been completely unable to tell that I was close to breaking down.

I worry about this media coverage. I know the way my brain used to think. I wanted to lose x pounds or get to x weight to feel like I was “worthy” of treatment. For people with eating disorders, this viral story can be triggering and harmful.

2. In a Communication class, I learned this point: “The media is the message.” I want to look at the message that comes through the articles.

In the news articles I saw, I viewed many pictures of Rachael looking severely emaciated and vulnerable, and media articles used words like “desperate” and “shockingly thin.” I’m glad that donations poured in, but why did this story become so popular in the first place?

The media has a strange, glamor-tinted fascination with anorexia. The more severe the story, the more people are interested. In a country full of “obesity epidemic” lingo and sayings like, “You can never be too rich or too thin,” culture is fascinated with people who maybe “went too far” by developing severe anorexia. They receive our sympathy points, and we read the articles. Oh yes, we read those articles about Rachael Farrokh. We saw the pictures, the many pictures.

The pictures that accompanied many of these articles (and the Youtube clip) are nothing short of what Kelsey Osgood coined, eating disorder porn. These images aren’t healthy to anyone. They are triggering to ED sufferers, exploitative of a woman who is clearly dying or is at extreme medical risk, and they falsely portrays what an eating disorder is like in most cases.

Rachael Farrokh is sick. Her body and mind are deprived of nourishment they need to survive. And in the midst of that the media is fascinated with how she looks, and these constant pictures seem exploitative, as if she is being show off in some theater of the grotesque and public pity.

Anorexia and other eating disorders are not sexy or glamorous, as media messages might indicate.

They are severe psychosocial disorders, and those suffering from them need treatment, rather than being exploited by their pictures being blown up on the internet.

3. Even as I write this, I think that deep down, this whole story is a farce to the real story. The real story is this: Stories like this should not be happening in the first place.

Why can’t all people with eating disorders receive affordable eating disorder treatment?

Why does there need to be a Go Fund Me page not only for Rachael but for anyone with an eating disorder?

Well, that’s an easy answer: because the American health care system is not conducive to helping people get eating disorder treatment. 

ED sufferers have a high mortality and relapse rate, and insurance companies (in my experience historically) do not like to cover full, comprehensive treatment for treating the disorder.

A few years ago, I was at a point in my life in which I was looking at doing IOP (intensive outpatient) treatment. My insurance company denied my claim for services, even though I was out of control and in desperate need for help. I flat-out asked this question: “If I weighed 5 pounds less, would you authorize me to go to treatment?” Whoever I was talking to at the ever wonderful Blue Cross didn’t directly answer that question but did say this, “You might have a better case.”

You might have a better case.

As if I have to plead the right to receive eating disorder services, that my insurance company is all but telling me: Lose 5 pounds and you can get the help that you need.

How fucked up is that.

As I’ve said in this blog post several times, eating disorders are severe, and weight is often not a good indicator of how much someone needs or “deserves” treatment.

Everyone deserves treatment. NO ONE deserves to go through the living hell of an eating disorder. While we heard about Rachael’s extreme story in the news, there are countless people who are unable to afford treatment and are dying as a result.

The American health care system needs to understand ALL eating disorders for what they are and be able to offer treatment for those who need it.

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In sum, the media has done a disservice to others with eating disorders. The articles full of glamour-tinted images of someone dying of anorexia do not accurately describe the experience of most people with eating disorders. In addition, no articles I’ve read mention the systemic injustices having to do with lack of insurance coverage for eating disorder treatment.

I have nothing against Rachael Farrokh. I hope she recovers fully and goes on to live a full, meaningful life. But the media, society, and we as individuals need to think critically about this story and how we understand anorexia and eating disorders in general.

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